Don’t Make this Stupid Mistake #8: Promise to Conclude Your Speech Before You Intend to Conclude

Here’s the situation:  Recently I attended a presentation that was relevant to me.  I wanted to be there.  At the same time, a thousand other things were clamoring for my attention that day.  I’m sure you have the same problem.  We all feel we are too busy, and we give our time and attention as a gift.  Effective speakers let their audiences know they are aware of time constraints and will stick to them. 

Here’s the stupid mistake:  Several times, the speaker said “in summary” and then kept talking.  Each time, I began mentally ready for the presentation to be over.  When the speaker kept talking, I became irritated.  It was like he made a promise and then broke it.Looking back, I think this speaker was using “in summary” as a transition between one point and the next.  The problem is that listeners are conditioned to hear this phrase as “this speech is coming to an end!”

Here’s the solution:  Think of the words, “in summary,” or “in conclusion” as a promise that the presentation will be over momentarily.  The audience hears these words as a promise—don’t say the words unless you intend to k Think of the words, “in summary,” or “in conclusion” as a promise that the presentation will be over momentarily.  The audience hears these words as a promise—don’t say the words unless you intend to keep the promise.  When you need a transition, choose a different phrase!

For more stupid mistakes that sabotage your speech, go to http://www.incrediblemessages.com/products.htm#howtowin.

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3 Responses to Don’t Make this Stupid Mistake #8: Promise to Conclude Your Speech Before You Intend to Conclude

  1. Rick says:

    So what are some good transition phrases?

  2. Rick says:

    i agree with your point! I too hate it when a speaker does this.

    So what would be some good transition phrases?

  3. incrediblemessages says:

    I suggest clearly identifying the key sections of a speech early on and then referring to them throughout. It’s okay to say, “Now as we are finishing up with point #1 (whatever that is), we can turn our attention to point #2 (whatever that is).” The specific words, “in summary” or “in conclusion” are the ones that get a speaker into troouble.

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